HR Managers Must Lead in Developing Managers to be Coaches

As HR professionals, in an era where good talent is often difficult to find, keeping our employees is a high priority.  Turnover rate in this time of full employment makes our jobs harder if your managers lose good people.

For this reason, more than ever, we need to make sure that “Bad Bosses” is just a movie and not a reality in our companies.  A bad boss can cause good employees to leave, as found in a Huffington Post article “9 Bad Manager Mistakes that Make Good People Quit.” Usually that manager puts themselves, not their employees, first. Employees are a way to get results to them, rather than an asset to be cared for and grown.

What is the solution?  Your managers need to learn to coach!  When we realize that Millennials are the dominant generation in the workforce (who are used to receiving constant feedback, growing up in whatever sport or activity they pursued) it is more critical to mentor, be available and open to their needs and development, and ask the right questions to lead them to their success.

If managers ignore the need for both positive as well as “improvement areas” (feedback), these workers may be discouraged and quit.  Unintended turnover?  You bet; this is what keeps us HR professionals from getting a good night’s rest.

Performance Management does not mean a review once a year.  It means continuous coaching and feedback for all employees (good or constructive).  The one-on-one meeting at least once a month is a way to get to know the employee, which may positively affect performance, just as much as it allows for setting up coaching time for both parties.

We have no choice. With “Wisconsin’s unemployment rate nears all-time low as low-skilled wages erode,” (cited by the WI State Journal) competitive recruiting will continue to soar; the cost to replace a good employee that leaves will go up.  In this case, we are the shepherds that have to watch our flock!


Submitted by: Jefferson County HRMA

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